Three competitive grants for Bijvoet PhD candidates

The Bijvoet Center has awarded 6 months project grants to three PhD candidates. The grants were awarded competitively based on peer review of research proposals written by the PhD candidates themselves. The projects will be part of the NWO funded Graduate Programme, coordinated by dr. Stefan Rüdiger, who was impressed by the quality of the … Read moreThree competitive grants for Bijvoet PhD candidates

LIFT grant for Ineke Braakman

Three chemists from Utrecht have received funding for collaborations with private partners from the NWO Chemistry Innovation Fund. Prof. Geert-Jan Boons (Chemical Biology and Drug Development) will work with Friesland Campina to identify complex carbohydrates in order to produce better food products for infants. Prof. Ineke Braakman (Cellular Protein Chemistry) will cooperate with Galapagos and … Read moreLIFT grant for Ineke Braakman

Ineke Braakman appointed in board of NWO

Prof. Ineke Braakman, Professor of Cellular Protein Chemistry, will become the chair of the domain Exact and Natural Sciences (ENS) on January 1, 2017 of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). “The current board of NWO is delighted about the new appointments and looks forward to realising a supple and quick transfer in the autumn … Read moreIneke Braakman appointed in board of NWO

Zon-Mw TOP grant for research into the cause of Alzheimer’s

Prof. dr. Casper Hoogenraad (Utrecht University), Dr. Stefan Rüdiger (Utrecht University) and Dr. Ruud Toonen (VU Amsterdam) have jointly been awarded a Zon-Mw TOP grant of 675,000 euros. With this grant, they hope to be able to make a breakthrough in their research into the molecular cause of Alzheimer’s. The composition of their team is … Read moreZon-Mw TOP grant for research into the cause of Alzheimer’s

Clumping proteins disable anti-cancer- network

Insight in derailing cancer cell offers new clues for cancer treatment Scientists at UMC Utrecht and Utrecht University have discovered that genetic changes in the DNA of cancer cells can lead to the formation of small protein aggregates. These aggregates subsequently disable a whole network of tumour-suppressing proteins, thereby causing cancer growth. This new insight … Read moreClumping proteins disable anti-cancer- network